Baby Feeding

Starting Solids

Most experts recommend that you wait until baby is 6 months old before you introduce solids. Before you start solids, talk to your baby’s doctor.

Here are some signs that your baby MIGHT be ready:

  • Watches or imitates you eating
  • Can hold his head up reliably
  • Sits well and steady
  • Suddenly wakes every 1-2 hours at night
  • Seems hungry after feedings

 

What are good first foods?

Traditionally, new parents use single-grain cereals (rice, barley, wheat) as a first food. You buy pre-mixed or powdered that you mix yourself with formula, water, or breastmilk. Just a couple of tablespoons is probably enough. You also can try fruit and vegetable purees as a first food. Wait 2-3 days before introducing new foods and be aware of allergic reactions like diarrhea, vomiting, or rash.

 

Sample Menu For 6 – 9 Month Old

Early Morning

  • Breast milk or iron fortified formula

Breakfast

  • Breast milk or of iron fortified infant formula1 tsp – 2 Tbsp infant cereal
  • 1 tsp – 2 Tbsp fruit or vegetable
  • 1 tsp – 2 Tbsp protein foods

Snack

  • Breast milk or iron fortified infant formula

Lunch

  • Breast milk or iron fortified infant formula1 tsp – 2 Tbsp infant cereal
  • 1 tsp – 1 Tbsp vegetable
  • 1 tsp – 2 Tbsp protein foods

Snack

  • Breast milk or iron fortified infant formula

Dinner

  • Breast milk or iron fortified infant formula1 tsp – 2 Tbsp infant cereal
  • 1 tsp – 2 Tbsp fruit
  • 1 tsp – 2 Tbsp protein foods

Before Bedtime

  • Breast milk or iron fortified infant formula

 

Around 9 months, your baby may be ready for “finger foods.” Your baby may be ready if he has been eating solids regularly and is able to grasp things with his fingers. Cut up bananas, cut up & well-cooked veggies, and lightly toasted bread are good examples of first finger foods. Always supervise your baby when he is eating, because finger foods can be choking hazards.

Sample One Day Menu for an 8 to 12 Month Old1

Breakfast

  • 1⁄4–1⁄2 cup cereal or mashed egg
  • 1⁄4–1⁄2 cup fruit, diced (if your child is self- feeding)
  • 4–6 oz. formula/breastmilk

 

Snack

  • 4–6 oz. breastmilk/formula or water
  • 1⁄4 cup diced cheese or cooked vegetables

 

Lunch

  • 1⁄4–1⁄2 cup yogurt or cottage cheese or meat
  • 1⁄4–1⁄2 cup yellow or orange vegetables
  • 4–6 oz. formula/breastmilk

 

Snack

  • 1 teething biscuit or cracker
  • 1⁄4 cup yogurt or diced (if child is self-feeding) fruit
  • Water

 

Dinner

  • 1⁄4 cup diced poultry, meat, or tofu
  • 1⁄4–1⁄2 cup green vegetables
  • 1⁄4 cup noodles, pasta, rice, or potato
  • 1⁄4 cup fruit
  • 4–6 oz. formula/breastmilk

 

Before Bedtime

  • 6–8 oz. formula/breastmilk or water
    (If formula or breastmilk, follow with water or brush teeth afterward.)

 




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1) Caring-for-Your-Baby-and-Young-Child:  Sample One Day Menu. 2009. American Academy of Pediatrics.http://www.aap.org
Content Photo Credits: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net