Register for upcoming My Baby & Me Provider Trainings:

Upcoming Events


EventSpot by Constant Contact

MY BABY & ME

Prospective Providers

The Issue: Alcohol Use During Pregnancy

  • The CDC estimates that about 1 in 13 pregnant women reported drinking alcohol in the past 30 days, 1 and SAHMSA estimates that 18% of women drank during their first trimester.2
  • Drinking during pregnancy is the leading known cause of birth defects and is associated with a host of poor birth outcomes including low birth weight, prematurity, miscarriage, and stillbirth.
  • The Institute of Medicine says, “Of all the substances of abuse (including cocaine, heroin, and marijuana), alcohol produces by far the most serious neurobehavioral effects in the fetus.” 3

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are 100% preventable. As a prenatal care provider, you are in a unique position to help women stop or significantly reduce their alcohol consumption during pregnancy, resulting in healthier women and healthier children.

Benefits to Healthcare Agencies and Providers

Participating My Baby & Me agencies receive the following free services:

  • Onsite, individualized training on best practices in FASD prevention messaging, prenatal alcohol education, screening, and brief intervention
  • Educational materials and incentive gifts for women who participate
  • Additional support programs (texting and online) for women who want and need extra support

Take the First Step

Learn more about My Baby & Me and how you can incorporate this program into your work. Contact Chelsea Stover, Program Coordinator, at 608-251-1675 ext.118 or cstover@wwhf.org

Back to My Baby & Me Provider Portal

Page references:

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2010. Preventing Major Birth Defects Associated with Maternal Risk Factors. www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/aboutus/birthdefects-bd-maternal.html.
  2. Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration. 2013. Report on Pregnancy and Alcohol www.samhsa.gov/data/spotlight/spot123-pregnancy-alcohol-2013.pdf
  3. Stratton, K.; Howe, C.; and Battaglia, F. 1996. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Diagnosis, Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine, National Academy Press. http://books.nap.edu/html/fetal